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Stag Party Sligo Activities

Stag Party Sligo
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We have assembled some great pre-built packages which have been hand selected to ensure that you and your group have the ultimate experience!
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Package 1

Package 1

Cocktail Making. Clubbing.
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Package 2

Package 2

Sea Fishing. Clubbing.
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Package 4

Package 4

Murder Mystery Night. Clubbing.
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Package 5

Package 5

Crystal Maze. Clubbing.
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Package 6

Package 6

Watersports. Clubbing.
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Package 7

Package 7

White Water Rafting. Clubbing.
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Package 8

Package 8

Kayaking. Clubbing.

Sligo Stag Weekends


This town in the north west of the country is a well located hub to base your stag party in. There are many ways to get a taste of the Atlantic with the...

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ild rugged cliffs along its coastal drives and with the pristine beaches along the way as well as all the opportunities to get into the water yourselves. The town is an energetic place to find yourself at the weekends and has a vast horde of music and entertainment venues to keep the party alive. There are also many occasions to sample some of the arts and feel the city's pulse at one of the theatres in town. Festivals and events are a regular occurrence in this north-west gateway to the Atlantic.


Culture:


There are plenty of examples of Sligo's cultural personality around the town with several theatres and arts centres and equestrian centres around town which give glimpses into the town's rich history. The town's ancient heritage is also strong with the town and surrounding area peppered with monuments dating back thousands of years. Carrowmore is the largest megalithic cemetery in Ireland and among the most important in Europe. There are regular festivals held in the town throughout the year.


Famous for:


William Butler Yeats and his brother the artist Jack are strongly associated with the town as they holidayed here regularly and the area inspired and was even the setting for a lot of either brothers works. There are many commemorations, galleries, quotes and other vestiges of the Yeats brothers and indeed they give the town a lot of its culture. Countess Markievicz, the pioneering female politician and member of the 1916 rising, came from Sligo. Ben Bulben, Sligo's 'Table Mountain' is the striking natural huge rock formation of shale and limestone which is believed to date from the ice age circa 320 million years ago. It can even be climbed if anyone feels adventurous. Sligo Abbey, a famous Dominican Friary dates from the 13th century and has a rich tale to it of its journey through the centuries. Bram Stoker, whose mother came from Sligo has cited ghost stories from the abbey as part of his inspiration for his novel, Dracula. Rosses Point is a seaside location north of Sligo town that is famous throughout Ireland for its fabulous Atlantic beaches, coastal roads and selection of sea-food restaurants.


Travel:


Sligo is well accessible from north, south and west and is near to the border. It is 40 miles from Enniskillen by the A4. It is 135 miles from Dublin by the N4 and is 85 miles to Galway travelling on the N17. It is 70 miles on the N15 to Lifford or Strabane. Stag do ideas: Some of the beauty to be seen in Sligo is best experienced on foot, with many excellent walking tours and trails, around the town, along rugged coastal paths on the Atlantic or through its many wildlife and flora filled woodlands. Bicycling is an option too for a bit more pace but be careful of drink driving and Atlantic cliffs which don't combine well. You could also go out on a boat trip on Lough Gill and get a look at the isle of Inisfree on the lake. For the bigger adrenaline rushes you might try the 7th Wave Surf School at Enniscrone beach where all amenities are there to get you out on the Atlantic with just a board. And while at Enniscrone whoever wants to stay dry but entertained can catch a round of Enniscrone pitch & putt.


Nightlife:


The evenings in Sligo are well suited to all sorts of revellers and the weekends are a particularly great time to be mingling in Sligo town centre. The Garavogue is a chief entertainment hotbed in the town with regular live bands, top end DJ's and a late night bar to accommodate the true party animals in your stag party. McGonnigles on O'Connell street is a trendy, atmospheric joint with a claim to being the hippest spot in the north west every Sunday with their Sunday MASS- Mass Acoustic Sunday Session. Foleys is a welcoming venue and is often regaling its patrons with traditional live Irish music. The Harp Tavern is a top venue for live music, be it Irish trad, contemporary or jazz. There are a variety of nightclubs to keep the party going when the hours push on. The Velvet Room on the riverbank has won awards and is certain to keep your party hopping. Toffs nightclub is another great late venue.


Overview:


Sligo is the county town of Sligo and with a population of 20,000 it provides a comfortable setting for a weekend party. It sits on the Atlantic coast in the north-west of the country and is located on the river Garavogue. There is a wealth of activities to take up daytimes on a break here and the town's warm hospitality is all around and there are a multitude of venues at which to be entertained when the evenings set in.


History:


Sligo dates at least back to the Neolithic period from when tombs and enclosures have been discovered. There is ample evidence that there was a stable and functioning population here from these times. Sligo, the medieval town is dated to the 13th century when Maurice Fitzgerald built the Castle of Sligo in 1245. In 1253 he built Sligo Abbey and donated it to the Dominicans. Fitzgerald failed to stave off the invasions from fellow chieftains and after his death the town changed many hands until the era of Henry VIII when it took a turn for the worse. The Act of Union in 1800 worked in the favour of urban centres like Sligo and it prospered again despite widespread poverty. The 1916 rising fuelled nationality in the town, not least due to countess Markiewicz and the town has been prosperous since.


Food:


There are a vast array of eating establishments around Sligo town and around its surrounding coastal regions. There are options all around town and if only strolling around the town you are assured to have an endless choice of eateries. The Swagman on Wine Street is a fine and affordable eating house in the town centre that provides the most delectable of Irish food that will satisfy all those activity weary appetites. For delicious affordable fast food there's something special about the food and the service you will get at StreetCart Gourmet Street Food on Teeling street. For an extra special and distinguished dining experience the Coach Lane at Donaghys will not disappoint.

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